Archives for category: Local Business

Last night, Will Yandik visited a Democratic meeting at the town hall in Tannersville. What he had to say was impressive.

Yandik, who is 38 (he looks younger) and runs a 100-year-old family farm in Columbia County, is running for Congress as a progressive. There is very little to separate him on most issues from Zephyr Teachout, his better-known competitor in the June 28 Democratic primary.


Will Yandik in Tannersville. Photo: Tom Pletcher, BlueInGreene.org.

Some readers will recall that this blog has already endorsed Ms. Teachout to replace Chris Gibson in Congress this fall. (Speaking of Chris Gibson, he surprisingly announced today that he is withdrawing from politics at the end of his current term.) But Yandik, in his brief address to the assembled Democrats and the follow-up Q & A, showed why many local voters really like him.

Yandik correctly views broadband as the single biggest economic issue for our region, and believes the federal government will need to play a role in finally bringing broadband to everyone, including laggard Greene County. He wants the environment protected and he wants consumer privacy preserved (backdoors in software to enable government surveillance should not be allowed, in his view).

Given the similarity of these stands to those of Zephyr Teachout, I asked Yandik why he decided to compete against her. His response: he believes that his local roots and knowledge give him a leg up and make him more resistant to Republican attack. He also noted that he feels the competition has made both candidates stronger.

Will Yandik is a strong candidate. It would be great if we could split the 19th Congressional District and elect Yandik and Teachout both. But we can’t, of course, and I continue to believe that Zephyr Teachout’s growing national reputation and superior name recognition make her the best candidate this time around. Even so, I’m sure we haven’t heard the last of Will Yandik.

I received a cheaply produced political flyer in the mail the other day—it was from Pete Lopez, getting an early start on next year’s Congressional election. The issue Lopez chose to highlight? Broadband and the lack thereof.

Ordinarily it would be a good thing to have a politico emphasize the need for broadband in our area and vow to help bring us up to speed. But Lopez is following in the footsteps of Chris Gibson, another politician who claimed for years to recognize the importance of broadband to this area and did fuck-all to make it a reality. This just seems like more of the same.

Pete Lopez
Pete Lopez: we need more broadband.

Lopez says he is counting on $500 million in state money to expand high-speed broadband to underserved areas. He says “a high priority for me will be to use these funds to build new Internet lines that would effectively serve our rural communities.” But he does not explain how he will achieve this. How, for example, will he persuade Mid-Hudson Cable to accept government funding to expand its service when it has rejected such funding in the past?

The question is of more than academic interest. Greene County ranks last in New York State in broadband availability, and the service it does have is arguably sub-standard.

Fortunately, another New York politician is on the case—New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman. His office is investigating whether current broadband providers are actually delivering the speeds they promise. (Spoiler: in many cases, they’re not.) You can help hold your provider accountable by going to this page, filling out the form, taking the broadband speed test at http://internethealthtest.org and attaching a screenshot of your test results to the form you submit to the AG’s office.

My provider is Mid-Hudson Cable, and according to the test I am receiving less than half the speed I’m paying for.

I’d like to see someone do something about that, and with luck someone will. But it’s likely to be the Attorney General’s office, not Pete Lopez.

As Greene County’s largest city, Catskill should pave the way toward progress. The slate of Democratic candidates representing Catskill in tomorrow’s election are in a position to do exactly that.

Let’s start with Doreen Davis, who is running for Catskill Town Supervisor against incumbent Joseph Leggio. Doreen has done a terrific job as the Greene County Democratic Committee Chair, infusing new energy and commitment into the party at the local level. Her extensive Fortune 100 managerial experience and her ideas for improving economic development, citizen participation and digital infrastructure are far superior to anything her opponent can offer. She would be a superb supervisor.

Elect Doreen Davis Town Supervisor
Elect Doreen Davis Catskill Town Supervisor. Photo: Beth Schneck.

Doreen’s husband Crane Davis is a sterling candidate in his own right. A decorated Vietnam veteran (Bronze Star, Purple Heart), Crane is a communications professional—former Time Magazine correspondent and producer and host on Channel 13, WNET in New York— who also has extensive, high-level marketing and consulting expertise. He would be an outstanding asset for the city and county alike.

Elect Crane Davis to the County Legislature
Elect Crane Davis to the County Legislature. Photo: Beth Schneck.

The Davises aren’t the only highly qualified candidates running in Catskill, of course. Kevin Lennon, Joe Kozloski and Vinny Seeley are also running for the Greene County Legislature from District 1, alongside Crane Davis. Pat McCulloch is running for Town Councilman.

Help build a better Catskill: vote Democratic on Tuesday, November 3.

Last night, Lori Torgersen, the Democratic candidate for the County Legislature representing Windham, Ashland, Jewett and Prattsville, made some brief remarks at Fitness Concepts in Hensonville. She was articulate and persuasive and would clearly be a strong asset for her district in the legislature.

Lori Torgersen
Lori Torgersen. Photo: tpletcher.

Torgersen is bright, energetic and accomplished—she is especially well-regarded for her work (she was a co-founder) with the Windham Area Recreation Foundation (WARF).

From Torgersen’s website:

WARF is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to establishing the Windham region as a preeminent four-season destination and bettering the lives of its residents and visitors through the enhancement of trail-based recreation opportunities. WARF’s accomplishments include bringing the UCI Mountain Bike World Cup to Windham for five of the last six years and building the extremely popular multi-use Windham Path. Perhaps most importantly, WARF raised over $200,000 in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene and devised a system to fairly and efficiently distribute the funds to businesses and individuals in need.

In addition, Ms. Torgersen cited two of Greene County’s longterm quality-of-life weaknesses and its subsequent lowly ranking within NY State: healthcare and broadband. She would like the county to fare better in both, and to do a better job of advocating for women’s interests as well.

If you missed Lori last night, you’ll have a chance to see and hear her tomorrow (Sunday, Oct. 25) at the Country Suite B & B from 2 to 4.

Vote Torgersen on November 3. She would help move Windham and Greene County forward.

I recently heard from Doreen Davis, the intrepid chair of the Greene County Democratic Committee.

Doreen wrote to let me know that, in addition to the Democrats’ traditional agenda of inclusion, opportunity and can-do common sense, this fall’s candidates share a focus on three important local issues.

Greene County Democratic Committee
Focused on important local issues.

These are:

  • A much-needed county-wide ambulance system
  • The impending construction of a jail and the need to balance ‘right-sized’ with ‘right-budgeted’
  • A determination to finally tackle the longstanding, abysmal lack of high-speed broadband in Greene County, after years of Republican inaction

All are excellent reasons to vote Democratic next month.

BTW, did you catch the Democrats’ national debate last night? A pleasant contrast to the ongoing Republican clown show, wasn’t it?

All politics may be local, as Tip O’Neill famously said, but that doesn’t mean that local elections necessarily amount to much. What O’Neill meant is that people tend to vote in their own narrow self-interest in local elections. Soaring rhetoric and grand principles seem to count for more in national elections, though even then voters seem to translate these in terms of their own political affiliations and belief systems. Especially now, when the country is so starkly divided.

Local elections have not changed much in Greene County in recent years. (National elections have not changed much in Greene County, either.) The county continues to lag statewide in many important areas, including education, health care and economic opportunity. Local officials nominally in charge of improving the situation have been a joke, and that’s phrasing it kindly.

Do local elections matter? Here in Greene County, not usually. But they could matter, with the right candidate(s).


Democratic Greene County Legislature candidates. Photo: Beth Schneck Photography.

There’s an election coming up in a few weeks—on Nov. 3—and a lot of new Democratic faces are in the mix. Let’s look at some of them.

Lori Torgersen is running to represent Windham, Ashland, Jewett and Prattsville in the county legislature. How would she make a difference? Her vision includes pursuing state, federal and private funding for important projects, including broadbrand, and working as an advocate for women’s interests. She has played a role in developing the Windham Path and organizing the Mountain Bike World Cup races in Windham. Almost everyone likes the former; some people question how much the latter does for the overall area economy, in part because it overlaps with her husband Nick Bove’s business interests. Still, Torgerson is saying a lot of the right things.

Aidan O’Connor, Jr. is running to represent Durham in the county legislature. O’Connor is a young paramedic who has extensive experience with Greene County Emergency Medical Systems and he is a driving force in the attempt to implement a coordinated, countywide ambulance service. God knows that’s something the county sorely needs.

Crane Davis is running to represent Catskill in the county legislature. Crane is Princeton-educated and a gifted communicator with political experience; he would seem to be an asset for Catskill.

Finally, Doreen Parsley Davis (who is Crane’s spouse and also the Greene County Democratic Committee Chair) is running for Catskill Town Supervisor. Doreen is a skilled political operative with extensive experience in managing large teams and budgets for Merck, a Fortune 100 company. Again, this sounds like experience Catskill could use.

Do local elections matter? This time, maybe so.

Former state Assembly Minority Leader John Faso, a Republican who said he was forming an “exploratory committee” last month, seems on the verge of formally announcing his candidacy for the 19th Congressional District. That, at least, is the strong impression given by a new johnfaso.com website, especially its “About” page.


The Fasos. Photo: johnfaso.com.

In the aforementioned About page, Faso says “A lot of us are left wondering if our children will have the same chances we did to live here in Upstate New York, start a career and raise a family of their own.”

I want to work to change that, he says.

How? By talking about broadband for years while doing nothing, like Chris Gibson? By doing nothing to improve rural education or medical access? By maintaining the stagnant upstate status quo, which seems to be the modus operandi of both political parties?

And speaking of both political parties, where are the Democratic candidates? So far we have John Patrick Kehoe, of Rochester—not a great start.

Is there no one who actually lives in the 19th Congressional District capable of running a compelling, charismatic, progressive campaign?

Since not much else seems to work, the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence has decided to try a new approach: humor.

There is a website, CrimAdvisor, which purports to show criminals where their best options are (and the facts are all too real). And there is the video below:

Those of you with your hearts in the right place will laugh, and hope this campaign has some sort of impact. The rest of you here in upstate New York may laugh at the notion that this state is one of the "unfriendliest" for would-be gun purchasers. There’s certainly no lack of buying opportunities here in Greene County.

I almost decided to ignore this election. Yes, the country is in dire straits and the stakes are indeed high. But it’s likely this election will have almost zero impact on any of our nation’s most important problems. For the first time in my life I’m tempted to skip voting altogether.

Vote Blue—Power to the People
Vote Blue 2014 POWER TO THE PEOPLE logo by Jeff Dombrowski.

And yet … there are differences. So you can argue citizens have a duty to choose, so as to minimize destructive outcomes. Chris Gibson is widely viewed as a nice guy, but that is no reason to vote for him, as this editorial makes clear. As for the rest of tomorrow’s choices, progresssive voters would do well to vote the Working Families Party line, with the exception of the choices for Governor and Lieutenant Governor. There, the vote should go for Green Party candidates Howie Hawkins and Brian Jones.

Here’s hoping I’m wrong, and tomorrow’s election will somehow make a difference.

Dick May, who founded and wrote the SeeingGreene blog for nearly a decade, passed away late last week.

Dick used his blog to comment perceptively on a wide range of issues affecting the county, including the Second Amendment issues that are so widely misinterpreted and misunderstood (his final post was on this subject). Dick’s clear-eyed, common-sense approach to life in Greene County was widely appreciated, and he will be missed.

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