Archives for category: Justice

Andrew Cuomo, thwarted in his desire to avoid a Democratic primary next month and still smarting from criticism over his questionable handling of endemic state corruption, decided to take his first trip outside the country as governor.

He went to Israel, to voice his support for that country’s “right to defend itself.”

Cuomo Meets Netanyahu
Tough guys: Cuomo Meets Netanyahu. Photo: Rina Castelnuovo for NY Times.

As the New York Times pointed out, Cuomo is just one of a number of U.S. politicians hastening to score political points back home by traveling to Israel to show support. Israel may increasingly be a pariah on the world stage, but a majority of Americans continue to support the country regardless of how many war crimes it commits.

Did I say “war crimes?” Indeed I did. Indiscriminate slaughter of civilians qualifies, and Israel has done nothing but ratchet up its disproportionate use of force as the years go by. Yes, the country has a right to defend itself. But killing 1,900 Palestinians, nearly half of those civilians, while losing 60 soldiers (and 3 civilians) is not defense—it is a powerful, lopsided and unjustified offense. And the enormous number of Palestinian deaths is only part of Israel’s savagery; the widespread destruction of homes, property and facilities will cripple life in Gaza for a long time to come. Life that Israel’s “peacetime” policies already render exceedingly hard.

To say Israel’s actions can be blamed on Hamas (as Cuomo and Hillary Clinton have done) is to excuse the inexcusable. If Hamas has militants and equipment within a civilian population—a civilian population packed into a small sliver of land— does Israel then have the moral right to obliterate that civilian population? The U.N. and most of Europe do not think so, but America apparently still does.

You’re ever the diplomat, Andy.

The mass shooting near UC Santa Barbara last Friday evening was but the latest in an seemingly endless stream of mediagenic gun tragedies. (Most gun-related deaths, murders and suicides alike, go unnoticed.) Once again we had a disturbed young perpetrator attacking his own frustrations by taking the lives of others, and then his own. Once again, we had candlelight vigils and pious expressions of sympathy. Once again, pundits attributed the latest slaughter to inadequate mental health procedures … to the culture at large, particularly misogyny … and to lax gun “controls,” even in a state with more “controls” than most.

But this time, we also had something different: we had a father of one of the victims putting the blame for this latest outrage where it belongs, with “craven, irresponsible politicians and the N.R.A.” Richard Martinez, whose son Christopher was among Friday’s victims, spoke with courage and spoke the truth. Watch him here.

Richard Martinez Calls Out Craven Politicians and the N.R.A.
Richard Martinez Calls Out Craven Politicians and the N.R.A. Photo: You Tube.

Martinez calls on everyone to tell their elected officials “Not One More”. It’s a heartfelt and media-savvy slogan, but of course without legislative and/or judicial action it will go nowhere. The United States is so in thrall to the gun lobby that it can’t even produce minimal, common sense gun “controls,” such as universal background checks. And even if we could, it wouldn’t be enough. As gun fanatics love to point out, there are already some 300 million guns in private hands out there.

The heart of the matter lies with the Second Amendment, and the Second Amendment, as presently interpeted, lies. For more than 200 years, federal courts interpreted the Second Amendment quite narrowly—the phrase “well regulated Militia” limited the scope of the amendment, it was felt. It was not a freestanding right to own guns, as interpreted today.

The National Rifle Association, more than any other group, helped to change this historical interpretation—Mr. Martinez is right on target there. In response to their efforts to change the Second Amendment’s historical meaning, former Chief Justice Warren Burger (a conservative appointed by President Nixon) said this represented “one of the greatest pieces of fraud, I repeat the word ‘fraud’, on the American public by special interest groups that I have ever seen in my lifetime.”*

Nevertheless, the N.R.A. succeeded. In 2008, in District of Columbia v. Heller, a majority of the Supreme Court accepted the view that Burger regarded as fraudulent.

Now another former member of the Supreme Court, Justice John Paul Stevens, has issued a call to reverse this flagrant misjudgment and its tragic consequences. In his book Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution (Little, Brown, 177 pp.), Stevens proposes the Second Amendment be modified to specify that it applies only to those who keep and bear arms “when serving in the Militia”.

Now that would be gun control. And that is what it would take to end or, at a minimum, strikingly reduce the number of mass shootings America contends with today. New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik points out that similarly tough restrictions have proved effective in Australia, Canada, Great Britain and other countries. And he too salutes the honesty and courage of Richard Martinez.

Do I believe the Second Amendment is likely to be modified anytime soon? No, I do not—not when assholes like those belonging to the “Brunswick Sportsmans Club” hold events like this one a scant four days after the killings in California. BTW, our own Congressman Chris Gibson of the 19th District is listed as a keynote speaker. Talk about craven, irresponsible politicians. Gibson deserves to be voted out of office in November for this alone.

No matter how high the odds against change, if the truth remains unspoken then the situation is truly hopeless. Richard Martinez’s courage counts for a lot. Those of us who acknowledge he speaks the truth must join him in speaking out. It’s the only way we can begin to counter the N.R.A. and its distortion of the Second Amendment.

* See The New York Review, June 5, 2014, page 8.

This blog normally publishes comments. However, today’s post is likely to bring out the usual frothing N.R.A. apologists and trolls—those comments will not be published or acknowledged. Genuinely thoughtful responses will be posted, however.

4/23/14: OK, I will grant that photographs can be unflattering or misleading. But I see that picture of Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin in today’s paper* and I can’t help feeling that some people are just naturally mean and ugly underneath, and so their homeliness shows up more readily than it does for others.

My grandparents used to own a little getaway cottage in rural northeastern Oklahoma, Ozarks country. They were “salt-of-the-earth” types, simple and conservative. Good people at heart, and certainly good to me, but prone to suspicion and intolerance like many of their neighbors in Oklahoma and Missouri (they lived in Kansas City). I think they would have sided with the majority of today’s Oklahoma public in the ongoing death penalty debate—they would have wanted the executions to proceed, especially given that both of the men scheduled to die are black.

Difficult to acknowledge, but true. And apparently still true of many Oklahomans today.


Ugly is as ugly does.

So my onetime Oklahoma connection makes me especially curious about the ongoing methodological debate over executions that’s currently occurring there.

Clayton Lockett is one of the two black men scheduled to die in that bright red state. He was convicted of murder and does not contest the conviction. But the state wants to use a mix of poisons to kill him and they won’t say what it is or what’s in it or where they got it. They’re determined to do this, that’s why the governor has her ugly picture in this morning’s paper. A couple of days ago, the state Supreme Court stayed Lockett’s execution until the chemical questions could be answered, but then Governor Fallin said they’re going go ahead and inject him anyway. Just looking at her, you can see you she means it.

My question is, why does she have to come out like that in her blue suit and her red lipstick with a little silver cross around her neck and say we have to kill Lockett and this other guy right now? Why can’t she just wait for the question about what’s in the chemicals to get straightened out?

Well, I don’t think it’s because she’s a mean, hateful bitch, although that is probably part of it. It’s because the people who put her in office believe things should always work in a certain way, and they want her to run things in accordance with the way they believe. Anything unpleasant or unfortunate or unsettling or even confusing or different (read: otherness) needs to be disposed of as quickly as possible. Crime needs to be harshly punished. And not just crime, but the effrontery required to commit the crime. It has to be squashed without mercy.

Governor Mary doesn’t want the courts to interfere with disposing of Clayton Lockett and closing out his case.

I see she’s wearing some nice little earrings in what appears to be the same silver as her cross. And she’s got some kind of button or patch on her blue jacket; I can’t make out what it is.** There are nice, healthy-looking green plants sprouting in front of her podium. I think that’s funny. It’s like the plants are supposed to be warm and friendly and indicative of life and growth and happiness and so on. But Governor Mary is talking in this photograph and her mouth is open. You can see the sharp edges of her teeth, and the darkness inside that open mouth looks scary—not warm and friendly at all.

Clayton Lockett is black, as already noted, and so is the other guy they’re planning to execute, Charles Warner. Everyone else involved in this story is white, except the Chief Justice of the state Supreme Court. The fact that he’s black must represent some kind of progress, right?

It turns out the court, the state Supreme Court, is contradicting itself. Two days ago they put a hold on the executions. But now they say it’s fine to go ahead and inject that stuff, whatever it is. Lockett doesn’t need to know what’s in it or where it came from. Doesn’t even have the right to know, according to them.

Most of the OK State’s citizens were really pissed off when the court stayed the executions before. They started talking about impeaching the judges for not doing their duty (to execute Lockett and Warner). The judges got that message pronto.

I’m looking at Mary Fallin’s photo again. She’s got a little pig nose. Her nostrils really pop out at you in that picture, two black holes smack in the middle of her face. And that blond hair somehow makes her piggy nose stand out even more.

You know what the state Supreme Court said, after they caved on staying the executions? They said that Lockett’s request to know what drugs were going to be used to kill him was “frivolous and not grounded in the law”.

The particular dude, the justice, who said this went on to offer a bunch of analogies. He was one of the eight white justices, just for the record.

The justice said, “The plaintiffs have no more right to the information they requested than if they were being executed in the electric chair, they would have no right to know [who was] providing the electricity; if they were being hanged, they would have no right to know whether it be cotton or nylon rope; or if they were being executed by firing squad, they would have no right to know whether it be by Winchester or Remington ammunition. I hope that this case ends any thought of future journeys down this path that has led this court to this day.”

This frivolous path. This frivolous day.

Here’s the problem, though: other states have mixed and matched drugs to create their new death cocktail blends as well. And those executions were botched as a result—they lasted too long, they caused too much obvious pain. So it’s not unreasonable for Clayton Lockett and Charles Warner to wonder whether they’re going down that same path.

I think Governor Mary expects they are, judging by her photo.

* Theguardian.com. Fallin photo: Sue Ogrocki/AP.

** I checked later. Turns out it is the state seal.

4/28/14: Both men were convicted of pretty heinous crimes (Lockett of shooting a 19-year-old woman with a shotgun, then watching while she was buried alive; Warner of raping and killing an 11-month-old baby, though he claims he’s innocent), so my concern for them as individuals is somewhat deflated here. Plus, the state did wind up divulging the names of the drugs that will be used to kill these men tomorrow (at 6 PM and 8 PM). The source and composition/quality of the drugs remains unknown, however, and the issue of how executions are conducted (and whether they should be conducted at all) remains extremely important. I think most people would agree it’s likely there are people on death row somewhere who are innocent.

4/30/14: Things went very wrong during Lockett’s execution. You can read about it here.

This is what Governor Mary Fallin had to say:

“I have asked the department of corrections to conduct a full review of Oklahoma’s execution procedures to determine what happened, and why, during this evening’s execution of Clayton Derrell Lockett,” she said in a statement. “I have issued an executive order delaying the execution of Charles Frederick Warner for 14 days to allow for that review to be completed.”

Nice. She might have considered this “full review” at the same time the state’s Supreme Court originally stayed the executions, instead of sneering at them and proceeding apace.

As one of the inmates’ attorneys noted, “Clayton Lockett was tortured to death.” Richard Dieter, the executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, which monitors capital punishment, said someone “was killed tonight by incompetence.”

So what’s next?

Well, it would be somewhat redemptive if the Oklahoma Supreme Court reinstated the stay on Charles Warner’s execution, without an artificial time limit attached (he is currently scheduled to die in 14 days). That probably will not happen, though.

It may help if people outside the state make their feelings known, especially by joining with groups opposed to the death penalty, such as the ACLU or Amnesty International.

The point is, if you’re bothered by botched executions (or executions in general), you need to do something to try and change things.

Oklahoma and its governor are just one aspect of a very ugly situation.

It was Ghandi who said, “The true measure of any society can be found in how it treats its most vulnerable members.” By this standard, America has a long way to go. People without financial, intellectual or emotional resources do not fare well in this country. And animals, who cannot speak for themselves, are abused with appalling frequency.

Buster’s Law dates from 1999, when a teenager soaked a Schenectady house cat named Buster in kerosene and burned him alive. The law elevated animal abuse to a felony offense, punishable by up to two years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Both punishments seem far too lenient for someone who would deliberately inflict such suffering. Still, making animal abuse a felony does represent a step forward.

Now State Assembly Members Didi Barrett (D–106) and Jim Tedisco (R–112) are leading an effort to create a registry of convicted animal abusers under Buster’s Law. The statewide registry would be available to law enforcement, district attorney’s offices, humane societies and animal welfare and rescue organizations. Convicted animal abusers on the registry would be legally prohibited from keeping pets. In addition, animal abusers would have to undergo a mandatory psychiatric evaluation and register annually until a court declares they are “fit” to care for animals, based on psychiatric test results.


Photo: didibarrett.com.

This addition to Buster’s Law should be of some help in reducing animal abuse in our state. It would do nothing to address the crimes of factory farming—which continue to reflect poorly on our country’s lack of empathy for “lesser” creatures—but it would at least make it less likely for a truly sick person to be able to kill or torture household pets repeatedly. And that is definitely worth pursuing.

Today, February 11, is The Day We Fight Back Against Mass Surveillance. I’ll leave it to you to visit the link and contact your elected officials (Congressman Gibson will likely be receptive). Many people and organizations are behind this first drive to pass the USA Freedom Act and implement other reforms to reign in NSA spying.

What I’d like to do in this post is give you a brief outline of how to do a better job of protecting your privacy online.

First, a word of warning: there is currently no foolproof way to guarantee your privacy, online or anywhere else. But a lot of talented people are working to change that, and I think we can look forward to better privacy safeguards down the road. I hope we can, anyway.

The Fundamentals

It makes a difference which operating system you use. Windows is far and away the most vulnerable, but both Microsoft and Apple have likely cooperated with the NSA despite their official denials. I’d trust OS X over Windows, but the open source Linux is safer than either.

I’m sure most of you aren’t going to switch to Linux to gain increased privacy online—there are a fair number of technical hurdles involved for ordinary users. That being the case, you need to pay attention to the software you use.

Open source software is safer than proprietary software. This is true for the simple reason that anyone can view the code. Therefore, you should use open source apps whenever possible.

Internet Browsing Software

Firefox is the only major open source browser. It is safer than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, Google’s Chrome or Apple’s Safari. It is safer still if you use the HTTPS Everywhere extension, which encrypts connections to many sites. Still, even with Firefox, your browsing isn’t truly safe.

For genuinely safe browsing, use the Tor Browser Bundle. Tor software hides your location and prevents anyone from seeing your web travels or logging your web searches. The browser itself is based on an enhanced version of Firefox. The Tor Browser Bundle is easy to install, easy to use and available for all platforms. Even today, it should protect your browsing from the NSA.

Email Software

Currently, email—like chat or any social network—is pretty much a lost cause. It’s not safe, period. If you want to have minimal protection, then use the open source Thunderbird (from Mozilla, like Firefox) in conjunction with GnuPG encryption (Thunderbird has a plugin to enable this). But real security is down the road a ways, in the form of projects like Dark Mail.

The Cloud

Like Dropbox? So do I—but it and every other cloud storage provider has been targeted by the NSA. A safer alternative may be BitTorrent Sync, currently in beta. Because this service doesn’t store your files on a company-controlled server (or any server, for that matter), your data should theoretically be safer.

Bear in mind, though, that the NSA has succeeded in shipping computers from name-brand manufacturers with secret radio transmitters inside. These machines are compromised even if they never connect to the Internet. And if the NSA should decide to target you through a back door built into Windows or OS X to install a keylogger on your machine, there’s absolutely nothing that can help you. That’s how bad the situation currently is, and why we need serious reforms.

Yesterday’s long-awaited speech by President Obama on government spying and citizens’ privacy rights was largely anticlimactic. Most observers expected superficial, cosmetic “fixes”, and that is precisely what the president delivered. The NSA will basically continue to scoop up whatever it wants, whenever it wants, with very little oversight.

Don’t give up hope, though—Obama’s compromised stance on national security vs. privacy rights is unlikely to be the last word.

As Cindy Cohn, legal director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, put it: “Now it’s up to the courts, Congress, and the public to ensure that real reform happens, including stopping all bulk surveillance—not just telephone records collection.”


NSA: Eyes and Ears Everywhere. Graphic: Wikipedia.

Some groups were more critical still. Steven Hawkins, the executive director of Amnesty International, said Obama’s remarks would be remembered as “music on the Titanic”. Anthony Romero, the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union, added that the government “is engaging in a textbook example of an ‘unreasonable search’ that violates the constitution”.

There’s already action in the works to go further toward genuine reform. The USA Freedom Act sounds uncomfortably like the Patriot Act, and in fact it was co-launched by one of the Patriot Act’s authors, Republican Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin, together with Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont. Sensenbrenner has had grave second thoughts about the way the Patriot Act turned out, and the USA Freedom Act is intended to counter some of the earlier bill’s worst effects. 120 congressmen have already signed on, including our local Congressman Chris Gibson.

There are other powerful forces lined up against NSA overreach as well. One is the Reform Government Surveillance group founded by some of technology’s biggest companies, including Apple, Google and Microsoft. They want to undue the damage that NSA spying revelations have done to American business interests abroad, which has been substantial.

The NSA also has powerful allies, though, and true reform will not be easy. But I believe we can go much further than the president suggested yesterday. I work in the technology sector, and I’ll outline some personal steps you can take to protect your individual privacy in a future post.

The new year is nearly upon us—what to expect is anyone’s guess, but what we should strive for is increasingly clear. Broadly, we need more equality, greater justice and a more peaceful, sustainable world. Here is an excellent outline of some of the specifics, courtesy of Senator Bernie Sanders from neighboring Vermont.

Dear Thomas,

I want to take this opportunity to wish you and yours a very happy new year. I also want to express my gratitude to you for the political support that you have given to me, and for all of your efforts in trying to move our country and the world in the direction of peace, justice and environmental sanity.

As we survey our country at the end of 2013 I don’t have to tell you that the problems facing us are monumental, that the Congress is dysfunctional and that more and more people (especially the young) are, understandably, giving up on the political process. The people are hurting. They look to Washington for help. Nothing is happening.

  • The middle class continues to decline with median family income some $5,000 less than it was in 1999.
  • More Americans, 46.5 million, are now living in poverty than at any time in our nation’s history. Child poverty, at 21.8 percent, is the highest of any major country.
  • Real unemployment is not 7 percent. If one includes those who have given up looking for work and those who want full-time work but are employed part-time, real unemployment is 13.2 percent — and youth unemployment is much higher than that.
  • Most of the new jobs that are being created are part-time work at low wages, but the minimum wage remains at the starvation level of $7.25 per hour.
  • Millions of college students are leaving school deeply in debt, while many others have given up on their dream of a higher education because of the cost.
  • Meanwhile, as tens of millions of Americans struggle to survive economically, the wealthiest people are doing phenomenally well and corporate profits are at an all-time high. In fact, wealth and income inequality today is greater than at any time since just before the Great Depression. One family, the Walton family with its Wal-Mart fortune, now owns more wealth than the bottom 40 percent of Americans. In recent years, 95 percent of all new income has gone to the top 1 percent.
  • The scientific community has been very clear: Global warming is real, it is already causing massive problems and, if we don’t significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the planet we leave to our kids and grandchildren will be less and less habitable.

Clearly, if we are going to save the middle class and protect our planet, we need to change the political dynamics of the nation. We can no longer allow the billionaires and their think tanks or the corporate media to set the agenda. We need to educate, organize and mobilize the working families of our country to stand up for their rights. We need to make government work for all the people, not just the 1 percent.

Before we talk about 2014, let me ask you a favor. Do you know of friends, family or co-workers who might be interested in receiving our email newsletters and updates? If you do, please forward this email and encourage them to sign-up for occasional updates. They can sign-up for our emails by clicking here.

When Congress reconvenes for the 2014 session, here are a few of the issues that I will be focusing on.

WEALTH AND INCOME INEQUALITY: A nation will not survive morally or economically when so few have so much while so many have so little. It is simply not acceptable that the top 1 percent owns 38 percent of the financial wealth of the nation, while the bottom 60 percent owns all of 2.3 percent. We need to establish a progressive tax system which asks the wealthy to start paying their fair share of taxes, and which ends the outrageous loopholes that enable one out of four corporations to pay nothing in federal income taxes.

JOBS: We need to make significant investments in our crumbling infrastructure, in energy efficiency and sustainable energy, in early childhood education and in affordable housing. When we do that, we not only improve the quality of life in our country and combat global warming, we also create millions of decent paying new jobs.

WAGES: We need to raise the minimum wage to a living wage. We should pass the legislation which will soon be on the Senate floor which increases the federal minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 an hour, but we must raise that minimum wage even higher in the coming years. We also need to expand our efforts at worker-ownership. Employees will not be sending their jobs to China or Vietnam when they own the places in which they work.

RETIREMENT SECURITY: At a time when only one in five workers in the private sector has a defined benefit pension plan; half of Americans have less than $10,000 in savings; and two-thirds of seniors rely on Social Security for more than half of their income we must expand Social Security and make sure that every American can retire with dignity.

WALL STREET: During the financial crisis, huge Wall Street banks received more than $700 billion in financial aid from the Treasury Department and more than $16 trillion from the Federal Reserve because they were “too big to fail.” Yet today, the largest banks in this country are much bigger than they were before taxpayers bailed them out. It is time to break up these behemoths before they cause another global economic collapse.

CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORM: We are not living in a real democracy when large corporations and a handful of billionaire families can spend unlimited sums of money to elect or defeat candidates. We must expand our efforts to overturn the disastrous Citizens United Supreme Court decision and move this country to public funding of elections.

SOCIAL JUSTICE: While we have made progress in recent years in expanding the rights of minorities, women and gays, these advances are under constant attack from the right wing. If the United States is to become the non-discriminatory society we want it to be, we must fight to protect the rights of all Americans.

CIVIL LIBERTIES: Frankly, the National Security Agency (NSA) and some of the other intelligence agencies are out of control. We cannot talk about America as a “free country” when the government is collecting information on virtually every phone call we make, when they are intercepting our emails and monitoring the websites we visit. Clearly, we need to protect this country from terrorism, but we must do it in a way that does not undermine our constitutional rights.

WAR AND PEACE: With a large deficit and an enormous amount of unmet needs, it is absurd that the United States continues to spend almost as much on defense as the rest of the world combined. The U.S. must be a leader in the world in nuclear disarmament and efforts toward peace, not in the sale of weapons of destruction.

Let me conclude by once again wishing you a happy and healthy new year — and by asking you to share this email with friends, family and co-workers. They can sign-up for our occasional emails by clicking here.

This is a tough and historical moment in American history. Despair is not an option. Let us stand together as brothers and sisters and fight for the America our people deserve.

Thank you for your continued support.

Sincerely,

Senator Bernie Sanders

To the Senator’s worthy agenda, I would only add this:

GUN VIOLENCE: It’s time we treated gun violence as the public health menace it is. That means real legislative reform and much tougher regulation. This is one of the most, if not the most, politically difficult fights that rational Americans face today, but it is increasingly urgent.

Here’s to a better world in 2014. Happy New Year, everyone.

As I wrote earlier today, it has been one year since the atrocity at Newtown. Since then, some 1,000 people have lost their lives to guns in America every month. It’s time for New York State to stop participating in this insanity.

That’s why BlueInGreene created a petition to The New York State House, The New York State Senate, and Governor Andrew Cuomo, which says:

“Divest New York State’s pension funding from companies that invest in or profit from the gun industry.”

Please click here to sign the petition.

Thank you.

In the immediate aftermath of the Newtown murders, one year ago today, it seemed as if the horror of the crime finally broke through Americans’ collective rationalizations regarding gun violence. But only for a moment.

Some states, including New York, passed laws intended to curtail the violence. Insane protests sprang up at once, as the right frothed and spewed over the trampling of their God-given freedoms. Many more states passed laws relaxing gun controls.

A number of well-meaning groups were formed to address the “problem” (such an inadequate word, in the context) of gun violence in America. Mayors Against Illegal Guns, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s finest legacy, is the best known. That group recently partnered with another group called Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America to produce the message shown below. It is the centerpiece of the groups’ plans to “gather at over 50 events in more than 35 states to honor the victims of the tragedy in Newtown.”

As for the residents of Newtown itself, they’ve told the media to stay away. Joe Nocera, writing in today’s New York Times, highlights some of the reasons why.

In the 12 months since Newtown, anywhere from 11,484 to 33,373 people have died from guns in America, depending on who’s counting.

It’s hard to be optimistic.

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